$182 Phillip the Arab (1777 year old Ancient Roman Coin) - Silver Ant Art Collectibles Collectibles Coins Money Phillip the Arab 1777 year Kansas City Mall old Silver Ancient - Roman Coin Ant Phillip the Arab 1777 year Kansas City Mall old Silver Ancient - Roman Coin Ant Ancient,old,year,Ant,Arab,Silver,all-4music.com,/exumbrella1771821.html,the,Phillip,$182,(1777,Roman,Coin),Art Collectibles , Collectibles , Coins Money,- $182 Phillip the Arab (1777 year old Ancient Roman Coin) - Silver Ant Art Collectibles Collectibles Coins Money Ancient,old,year,Ant,Arab,Silver,all-4music.com,/exumbrella1771821.html,the,Phillip,$182,(1777,Roman,Coin),Art Collectibles , Collectibles , Coins Money,-

Phillip the Arab 1777 year Kansas City Mall old Silver Miami Mall Ancient - Roman Coin Ant

Phillip the Arab (1777 year old Ancient Roman Coin) - Silver Ant

$182

Phillip the Arab (1777 year old Ancient Roman Coin) - Silver Ant

Genuine 1777 year old Silver Roman Antoninianus featuring the Emperor Philip I quot;The Arabquot;. Hand selected for its near-uncirculated condition, bold strike, and massive diameter, this will be an heirloom that can be passed down for generations. Along with the coin, we include a beautiful wooden box with an engraved metal plaque, coin capsule for display, and transparent display stand. We guarantee the authenticity of our coins. Don#39;t miss the chance to own a piece of history.

About this coin:

Empress: Philip I quot;The Arabquot;
Obverse: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, Radiate bust right, draped cuirassed
Reverse: SECVRIT ORBIS, Securitas seated left, holding wand propping head with left hand.
Year Minted: 244 AD (approximately)
City Minted: Rome
Ref: RIC 48b

About the Emperor featured on this coin:

Little is known about Philip#39;s early life and political career. He was born in what is today Shahba, Syria, about 90 kilometres (56 mi) southeast of Damascus, in Trachonitis. His birth city, later renamed Philippopolis, lay within Aurantis, an Arab district which at the time was part of the Roman province of Arabia. It is accepted by historians that Philip was indeed an ethnic Arab. He was the son of a local citizen, Julius Marinus, possibly of some importance. Allegations from later Roman sources (Historia Augusta and Epitome de Caesaribus) that Philip had a very humble origin or even that his father was a leader of brigands are not accepted by modern historians.

Philip#39;s rise to prominence began through the intervention of his brother Priscus, who was an important official under the emperor Gordian III. His big break came in 243, during Gordian III#39;s campaign against Shapur I of Persia, when the Praetorian prefect Timesitheus died under unclear circumstances. At the suggestion of his brother Priscus, Philip became the new Praetorian prefect, with the intention that the two brothers would control the young Emperor and rule the Roman world as unofficial regents. Following a military defeat, Gordian III died in February 244 under circumstances that are still debated. While some claim that Philip conspired in his murder, other accounts (including one coming from the Persian point of view) state that Gordian died in battle. Whatever the case, Philip assumed the purple robe following Gordian#39;s death.

Overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers 4 years into his rule, Philip offered to resign, but the Senate decided to throw its support behind the emperor, with a certain Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed by his support that he dispatched Decius to the region with a special command encompassing all of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. This had a dual purpose of both quelling the rebellion of Pacatianus as well as dealing with the barbarian incursions. Although Decius managed to quell the revolt, discontent in the legions was growing. Decius was proclaimed emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and immediately marched on Rome. Yet even before he had left the region, the situation for Philip had turned even more sour. Financial difficulties had forced him to debase the Antoninianus, as rioting began to occur in Egypt, causing disruptions to Rome#39;s wheat supply and further eroding Philip#39;s support in the capital.

Although Decius tried to come to terms with Philip, Philip#39;s army met the usurper near modern Verona that summer. Decius easily won the battle and Philip was killed sometime in September 249, either in the fighting or assassinated by his own soldiers who were eager to please the new ruler. Philip#39;s eleven-year-old son and heir may have been killed with his father and Priscus disappeared without a trace.

|||

Phillip the Arab (1777 year old Ancient Roman Coin) - Silver Ant

Push Push-Nachrichten